Gongol.com Archives: May 2018

Brian Gongol


May 2018
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May 1, 2018

Threats and Hazards Don't be your own doctor

The physician whose name went on the medical "report" on candidate Trump says "He dictated that whole letter". To have reached this conclusion really didn't take a great deal of sophisticated textual analysis, but it's nice to have confirmation. The problem isn't just that the report itself was fabricated, it's that the patient insists so much on the fabrication. A person so compelled to lie and exaggerate about the smallest of things cannot be trusted in the big things. If someone lies when literally nothing is at stake, what could possibly be expected of their truthfulness when there are consequences to be paid for being honest?

News "I'm not trying to act like I'm driving a garbage truck in Des Moines"

It's nauseating for these words to come from someone masquerading as a conservative leader. Real conservatives know that people should be judged by their character, not their occupation.

News "Apprehend data instead"

Police say don't try to chase the perpetrator in a hit-and-run accident. Just record everything you can.

Health Homeopathic "remedy" contains saliva from rabid dogs

Homeopathy is a great example of the kind of quackery that justifies some regulation of certain products in the interest of public health and safety. Because...rabid dog saliva, for the love of Salk.


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May 2, 2018

Threats and Hazards Who paid the hush money?

After saying that the President had reimbursed his lawyer for a $130,000 hush-money payment, Rudy Giuliani will probably be forced soon to "clarify" that Michael Cohen was "reimbursed indirectly" via his retainer -- as though a lawyer in Cohen's role acts like an all-you-can-eat buffet. The fact we have a President so susceptible to blackmail is a national-security risk.

The United States of America A beautiful day at the Gateway Arch

St. Louis's signature monument really does make the city stand out


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May 3, 2018

The United States of America "Scout Me In"

The Boy Scouts of America announce their marketing plan to welcome girls to Cub Scouts (the full launch is later this year, but they report that 3,000 early adopters are already in). They're also changing the name of the program for older kids to "Scouting BSA" starting in February -- since the girls' track in the program is coming in 2019.

Threats and Hazards Spend no time defending the indefensible

Very well-put by David French: "We are not told to rationalize and justify sinful actions to preserve political influence or a popular audience."

Computers and the Internet Twitter's password problem

Oops: "We recently identified a bug that stored passwords unmasked in an internal log."

Business and Finance But don't call it a "hostel"

A hotel opens in Chicago promising "elegance and refinement" in a "shared room" lodging model. Er...okay. But it's still a hostel.

News Does anyone really know what's going on?

Noah Smith proposes as a basic model of the world that "Nobody knows what's going on, and everyone is trying as hard as they can." A better version of that might be modified to say that the people who are trying their hardest have the most humility about what they don't know. Overconfidence correlates with duty-shirking.

Broadcasting Netflix is fixing Season 4 of "Arrested Development"

Mitch Hurwitz is re-editing the season so that it's in the same chronological format as the rest of the series. Nice.


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May 4, 2018

Threats and Hazards So susceptible to blackmail

Rudy Giuliani has issued a statement apparently intending to clarify that the President's payments to keep Stormy Daniels from talking to the media were "nothing but a family thing", to borrow a phrase (not his words, but definitely his meaning). Besides the fact that the timing of the payment makes it self-evident that this quite certainly wasn't just a family thing, its existence alone highlights a very real security risk: The President's behavior (past and present) and his obsession with image make him dangerously susceptible to blackmail. That is a national-security risk. Think just of the revelation that he scripted his own fitness report: If someone lies when literally nothing is at stake, what could possibly be expected of their truthfulness when there are consequences to be paid for being honest? But when a person lies so casually about things that are so inconsequential (other than to his image), that is a person who is perhaps uniquely subject to manipulation.

Socialism Doesn't Work More control won't preserve authoritarianism -- it will only make the collapse worse

In response to an opinion piece by a Chinese legal scholar proclaiming the pending victory of China's "planned market economy", James Palmer, an editor at Foreign Policy, notes that "Chinese leaders believe -- wrongly -- that they can also use mass surveillance and AI to replace the necessity for openness in governance and freedom of speech and allow total control from the top." If one were looking to start a list of things that will cause massive anxiety and social unrest for the world in the intermediate-range future, one might start with this.

Weather and Disasters Gimme shelter

A creative -- if likely impractical -- approach to providing shelter in-place to those who lose their homes to natural disasters: Inflatable buildings that could be air-dropped into place and raised with helium. Good ideas, though, often emerge out of the seemingly impractical ones. And this particular idea highlights one of the big problems that comes back over and over with natural disasters: People need someplace safe to live and rest when their homes are lost. It's worth rubbing together a few brain cells to see if we can come up with better ways to do that.

News Ending a 42-year police career

Police officer signs off after 42 years, and his daughter (a dispatcher) is the one who gets to acknowledge the final call.

Threats and Hazards Vaporizing 1,800 jobs out of spite

Should the threatened trade war of tariffs exchanged between the United States and China become a reality, one study estimates that Iowa would lose more than 1,800 jobs to the resulting inefficiencies.


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May 5, 2018

Broadcasting Show notes: Brian Gongol Show on WHO Radio - May 5, 2018

Tune in from 2pm to 4pm Central Time

Business and Finance If California were a country...

...it would have the world's 5th-largest economy. Shall we now impose tariffs on exports from California to the rest of the country? Those seem to be in vogue.

Computers and the Internet Stop posting your old phone number on the Internet

A meme going around Facebook asks "Who can still remember their childhood telephone number?". Predictably, people are posting their old numbers in the comments. There's no such thing as a "security" question when people are this gullible. If only people realized that half of the dumb things they share in response to these social-media memes are extremely useful to the types of bad actors who would use their personal information against them. It's bad enough already that it takes virtually no effort at all to crack certain "security" questions like "What was your mother's maiden name?".


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May 6, 2018

Threats and Hazards Why remove 57,000 Hondurans?

A country of nearly 330,000,000 people surely has the capacity to accommodate 57,000 people without excessive strain. There's no need to be cruel -- which is how the revocation of "temporary protected status" for those Honduran immigrants really appears. They came to the United States after the devastation of Hurricane Mitch, and it shouldn't be seen as though the United States simply took on a deadweight of 57,000 people. By and large, people bring economic activity with them: If the border between Iowa and Minnesota were erased, the resulting "state" would have a much larger population, but the underlying economic activity would likely be more or less the same. The failure to understand this is deeply embedded in the conceit that immigrants "take" from the country to which they move. Kicking out the Hondurans really makes no sense at all. It's disruptive and hurtful.

Humor and Good News A+ advertising placement

When the tweet says something about Prince William, but the embedded ad appears to be a picture of an excited anthropomorphic pickle

Threats and Hazards When Putin's team doesn't want you to hold a rally

Doesn't really seem like there's a perfectly innocent explanation for this.


Recent radio podcasts


May 7, 2018

News New York's checkered history of political scandal

And that is why "limited" government matters even more than "small" government. Limit what you expect from it. Limit the powers you grant to it. Limit the damage that bad people can do when they get the levers of power. The limits matter even more than the apparent size.

Threats and Hazards The NRA picks Oliver North as new leader

The last three years have been one giant, non-stop natural experiment in escalation of commitment. And that's not a good thing.

Threats and Hazards "Jail is not a place for mental health patients."

A tough look at the problem of increasing rates of violent crime in small-town Iowa. We have layers of problems at play here -- from mental-health issues to politicians' drug-war posturing to overcrowding to underfunding to a punishment-based approach that neglects rehabilitation. The system needs lots of reform.

News Why police don't drive Crown Victorias anymore

Cop-rated SUVs are a whole lot better in a lot of ways.


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May 8, 2018

Iowa Foster parents take in their 100th child

After 22 years, they're dialing back a little so they can visit their biological grandchildren

Broadcasting Reel-to-reel tape recorders are trying to make a comeback

Radio geeks all over the world, fingertips still scarred from years of using razor blades to splice RTR tapes, bodies permanently demagnetized by bulk erasers, join in this chorus: "No...no...NONONONONONO!"

News The news is too much like a series of "Arrested Development" quotes

Too much of what's happening around the President involves incompetent offspring, lunatic attorneys, and suspicious foreign dealings


@briangongol on Twitter


May 9, 2018

Threats and Hazards Tell us more about those payments, Mr. Cohen

The President's personal attorney got some interesting project work from a variety of sources upon Trump's accession to the Presidency -- including payments from a high-profile Russian money man

News Keep a close eye on the "Belt and Road"

China's massive global infrastructure initiative isn't an unalloyed good, even for the countries getting the investments

Humor and Good News Rebirth of a dead Kmart

Chicago architects convert a 55,000-square-foot ex-Kmart store into an attractive college-prep school for $10 million

Health Soldier grows her own replacement ear

Built from rib cartilage, doctors carved out the replacement ear and implanted it inside her arm so it could grow. The doctors called the surgery (to transplant it onto her head) a success -- the ear will work, and it will even have nerve function.

Science and Technology Artificial intelligence gets attention from Congress

Sen. Joni Ernst has proposed a bill to create a "National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence", to serve in an advisory role to the President and Congress on competitiveness, risks, and developments in artificial intelligence, both domestically and internationally

News Professional reading lists -- and their limits

An intriguing dive into the nature of professional reading lists -- commonly issued by military leaders, though not found quite nearly often enough elsewhere. Aside from raw personal experience, nothing shapes a person more than the books they read. We'd be better off as a society if there were more open discussion (and debate) about which books ought to be read. Sen. Ben Sasse has made the case for families to create their own reading lists, and that's a worthy suggestion as well.

Agriculture "Chinese buyers are canceling orders for US soybeans"

It doesn't take actual tariffs to create trade disruptions. The threat alone has been enough to create real-world consequences.

News "The genius-bias is a strong one."

An interesting challenge to the way people (specifically men, in this article) credited with works of genius sometimes end up getting a free pass to behave awfully. We should probably grapple with that problem.

News Someone needs to atone for the eggplant emoji

Considering the near-simultaneous explosion in misspelled apps (Tumblr, Flickr, Reddit), the mainstreaming of emojis, and the rise of text-speak, future historians are going to wonder how an entire civilization became voluntarily illiterate all at once. The flexibility of English is one of the main reasons it's become the world's lingua franca, and its adaptability probably encourages creative thinking among fluent English speakers. But text-speak is still crap.

Weather and Disasters Severe weather patterns far quieter than normal

The National Weather Service office in Des Moines notes that on a year-to-date basis, we're at about half the number of severe storm (severe thunderstorm or tornado) watches issued nationwide, as compared to most years. Maybe even less than half.


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May 10, 2018

The United States of America When the winners are losers

Don Blankenship lost, but it's still worthwhile to read the compelling argument from Jay Cost that the nature of the primary electorate too often risks giving unelectable nincompoops the nominations to run in general elections. A primary-election/general-election system is a fully honorable and decent way to run a democracy -- IF people vote in the primaries. The problem for the US today is that people (backwardly) think being an independent voter requires sitting out the primaries. No matter how much people resent joining parties, the only way to get good general elections is to have broad-based primary elections. The only way to get good general elections is to have broad participation in primary elections. When sane people step out of the process at the top of the funnel, they end up disgusted with what comes out at the bottom. We really need for sensible centrist voters to get just as mad about stopping the wingnuts as the wingnuts get mad about advancing their pet issues. Every interested independent should pick a party and vote in a primary. You can re-register as "independent" the next day.

Business and Finance Generally good rules for running good meetings

Two additional items absent from an otherwise good list: (1) Include written reports with the agenda wherever they can substitute for an oral report; use the meeting to ask questions and debate rather than absorb info. (2) Not only should someone be in charge of running every meeting, someone else should be the designated Devil's Advocate, tasked with poking at least one hole in every major idea or proposal. Meetings generally succumb to passive groupthink without someone specifically charged with advancing a contrarian view.


Recent radio podcasts







May 16, 2018

Computers and the Internet Don't use personality-testing apps

The data from one such personality quiz (tied to Facebook) got released onto the Internet, exposing quite a lot about 3 million users. There's nothing wrong with a quest to better know the self -- but there's a lot to worry about when the shortcuts to the answers are being peddled online with the help of quizzes that are without accountability for the data.

Business and Finance Finland's test of the Universal Basic Income won't be extended

The measurable results of the experiment won't be shared for a while, but it's being suggested that the UBI under examination wasn't big enough to achieve really ground-breaking results -- they were still too small to sustain even the most modest lifestyle. There are good reasons to experiment with (and study) the UBI, as well as good reasons to avoid it.

News Aon Center plans a gondola thrill ride that would tip over the side of the building

If built, that would make the third major observation deck with some kind of gimmick in Chicago

Business and Finance Salt Lake Tribune eliminates one-third of newsroom jobs

The awful economics of metro-scale newspapers are having a serious effect

News There won't be a Chicago Spire, but two smaller (but big) towers instead

Laudably, they're being designed with setbacks


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May 17, 2018

News Obama Presidential Center gets first of many needed Chicago city approvals

The city's planning commission approved the center, so next it goes to the zoning commission. It's a half-billion-dollar plan, so there's understandable interest.

Computers and the Internet Google sister company Jigsaw says it can protect political campaigns against cyberattack

Wired reports that Jigsaw "will start offering free protection from distributed denial of service attacks to US political campaigns".

Computers and the Internet How to tell if it's "Laurel" or "Yanny"

An ambiguous synthesized pronunciation of the word "laurel" sounds like "yanny", depending on the characteristics of the speakers through which it plays. Finding out where the sound crosses over from one to the other is a passing exercise in mass culture, the likes of which are rare now that people watch fewer things in common than in the past.

Business and Finance People respond to incentives

Mortgage interest rates are rising (they're still low by historic standards, but they're at a 7-year high), so it's a big market for sellers of residential real estate

Threats and Hazards Apparent "swatting" incident in West Des Moines

Someone called 911 from a Jiffy Lube in Austin, Texas, to plant a fake report that sent a swarm of police to a house in West Des Moines in pursuit of a murder that hadn't happened


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May 18, 2018

Business and Finance China disclaims plans to cut trade surplus with US

US authorities claimed that China had agreed to cut its trade surplus to the United States by $200 billion. Chinese outlets with quasi-official government status have declared to the contrary. A $200 billion cut would be large and dramatic -- not to mention difficult for both economies to accommodate. It's hard to imagine China voluntarily reducing its economic output by $145 per person without some kind of massive compensation in return. And it's almost certain that such cuts would have a huge impact on both the US consumer and producer markets.

Health Triplets: Identical twins, plus a fraternal

As adults, the three all work in the same hospital -- the one where they were born. Quite a story.

News A big fine for a wolf whistle

An uncompromising view: "Those who break the law will face on-the-spot fines of up to 750". The bill appears to have passed in France's lower legislative chamber and is headed to the upper chamber for approval.

News Former Secretary of State has harsh words for his former boss

Rex Tillerson, to the graduating class at VMI: "It is only by a fierce defense of the truth and a common set of facts that we create the conditions for a democratic free society [...] If our leaders seek to conceal the truth or we as a people become accepting of alternative realities that are no longer grounded in facts, then we as American citizens are on the pathway to relinquishing our freedom."

Business and Finance Job losses to steel tariffs could get very real

"We could lose 50 to 60 jobs easily", says the chair of a Nebraska company that depends on steel to make parts. Even domestic steel has risen in price under the threat of tariffs (for what else should anyone have expected?), and that's a "tremendous burden" to the company. Hardly an isolated situation.

Business and Finance Chicago's distinctive Wrigley Building sells for $255 million

A massive eight times its sale price in 2011. But, sure, everything's perfectly normal in the real-estate market.

Threats and Hazards Ten people murdered in Texas high-school shooting

Another instance of violence in the ongoing public-health emergency of violence in American schools. This would be a very good time to examine the "No Notoriety" movement -- which asks the media to refrain from publicizing the name, likeness, or ideas of any mass murderer unless necessary to aid in an apprehension. Mass killings have an element of social contagion, so there is a role for media outlets to play in stopping the spread.

Threats and Hazards Bill Gates tried talking the President out of an anti-vaccine commission

The damage that could be done by a Federal government quest to discredit vaccines is almost unfathomable


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May 19, 2018

News Seattle's going to charge a few big companies $275 per employee as a special head tax

The money will be used for low-income housing and homelessness-related programs. Unsurprisingly, Amazon and Starbucks aren't pleased. The tax is to be collected annually from 2019 until 2023.

News President Trump wants the US Postal Service to punish Amazon

This cannot be viewed apart from an apparent vendetta against Jeff Bezos, who started Amazon and who (separately) owns the Washington Post (which isn't gentle to the President, nor should it be). The President does not deserve credit for reportedly donating his government salary if he is simultaneously using the government to advance his own personal business agenda or to punish others for behavior he doesn't like. It's not consistent.

Humor and Good News Air conditioning or allergy medication?

The people speak (in a totally unscientific survey): They want A/C

News Royal wedding illustrates some of the crazier aspects of British immigration law

The extraordinary case of an American becoming a member of the House of Windsor shows just how many hoops a person in Britain must jump through in order to marry a foreigner for love

Weather and Disasters Why don't we have a technological solution to children being left in hot cars?

There has to be a technological solution to this. Maybe a motion sensor tied to a thermometer and a small cell that dials 911? It can't be too hard or too expensive for Silicon Valley to figure out. We need this to prevent tragedies. While it is evident that technological answers to the problem could end up having unintended consequences (like making some parents less careful), that line of reason mainly reinforces the case for making sure that technologists have a firm grasp on the humanity of the issues on which they work -- from the social implications to the human factors involved.

News Secure your load

A truck traveling down the highway with a ladder barely clinging to the bed

Aviation News Chuck Yeager salutes "The Right Stuff" author Tom Wolfe

One of the few movies that can turn any red-blooded American misty-eyed.

The United States of America Federalist 39: Read it. Learn it. Love it.

The one-paragraph answer to every cheap shot taken at the Electoral College or the nature of the Senate: We have a Federal government, not a national one.

The United States of America Can we compel ourselves to promote the classical-liberal order without the threat of war?

Conservatives need to reject blind traditionalism, and the left has to resist the urge to recycle demonstrably failed experiments. The vigorous generation of new ideas (not just new policies) is good for everyone.

News When Chicago restaurants serve non-Chicago-style pizza

Deep dish needs sauce

Threats and Hazards As the old IBM posters said: "THINK!"

Logically, shouldn't the exit door from the fire stairs on the ground floor have a panic bar that opens outward? In a fire, nobody's coming in and climbing up (other than firefighters).

Threats and Hazards The US has ambassadors in a third of the world and special forces in three-fourths

As Dwight Eisenhower said: "Our concern over these affairs illustrates forcibly the old truism that political considerations can never be wholly separated from military ones and that war is a mere continuation of political policy in the field of force."

Humor and Good News Even New Orleans isn't 170' below sea level

It's low-lying, but not that low-lying

Computers and the Internet A cryptocurrency "mining" computer that doubles as a space heater

When the byproduct of something is so much entropy that it could heat a room, then that thing needs to justify itself in a much bigger way than cryptocurrency ever has. Cryptocurrency is a mania, not a paradigm shift.

Humor and Good News A thought on music

"Four bearded tenors trying to harmonize while one of them tickles a banjo ironically" is NOT a subgenre of alternative rock. Stop playing that crap on alternative rock stations.

Humor and Good News "The turducken of New Urbanism"

A proposal is out to convert a big abandoned office complex in Hoffman Estates, Illinois, into a "metroburb" -- a micro-suburb within a sprawling building

The United States of America The Republican Party can't afford to chain itself to an ethnic identity

Conservatism's roots in individual dignity should be conservatism's main appeal to people of all backgrounds: A belief in pluralism and the security of individual liberty, as goods in themselves -- regardless of race or faith or color or origin.


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May 20, 2018

News One-paragraph book review: "Social Engineering: The art of human hacking"

A long slog through an important subject, but unfriendly to the non-specialist reader


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May 21, 2018

News One-paragraph book review: "Crusade in Europe"

Strongly recommended for anyone interested in history, war strategy, or leadership


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May 23, 2018

News NFL will require players to stand for the National Anthem or teams will face fines

But let's ask some serious questions: Will the NFL do anything to actively address the problems that players sought to highlight with their gestures during the anthem? Will the league do anything to counter the false narrative that players were protesting the flag or the anthem, rather than conducting a protest during the anthem but not directed at it? Will the league require players, coaches, and referees to salute the flag with hands over their hearts, as proscribed by Flag Code? Will the NFL cease the use of giant, field-covering flags as prop, which is behavior expressly in violation of Flag Code, which prohibits the flag from touching the ground or from being "carried flat or horizontally"? Will the NFL put its money where its mouth is and put a halt to all sales of food and beverages during the playing of the anthem (the 49ers are hinting they'll suspend sales in just such a manner)?

Business and Finance US trade negotiators want to cut visas for Canadians and Mexicans, too

Unless those workers have some kind of bizarrely low marginal propensity to consume, then letting them into the country to work has, broadly, an economy-expanding effect. The United States is the world's most powerful magnet for talent, and the more of it we attract, the stronger a country we are.

News Pope OK with a man being gay

A man reports that Pope Francis expressed compassion for him when he revealed that he was gay, saying "God made you like this and loves you like this and it doesn't matter to me. The pope loves you like this. You have to be happy with who you are." That might be the kind of statement that aggravates the doctrinal purists, but regardless of its conformance with dogma, the Pope's reported statement sounds everything like one of pastoral care and concern. The Pope is, after all, a priest. And one would hope that any priest faced with another human being's anguish would choose to demonstrate concern, respect, and love rather than beating that person about the head with a strict interpretation of doctrine.

News Chicago City Council approves half-billion-dollar Obama Presidential Center

Only one alderman voted "no" -- because he objected to the $175 million the city is supposed to spend on infrastructure directly related to the center (with no plans for where the money will be found). And that's not a bad objection to muster. The tradition of building Presidential libraries is a neat one -- if they're sustainable projects with true educational and historic merit, and not just giant monuments to ego.

Threats and Hazards A look at Russia's crooked Facebook ads

Perhaps the biggest problem with the ads is their propensity to normalize really stupid, unthoughtful attitudes as a substitute for real thought


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May 24, 2018

The United States of America "Because it's about the flag, the censorship is even worse"

A thoughtful -- and conservative -- rebuttal to the NFL's plans to crack down on expression during the National Anthem

News No North Korean summit

The President has abruptly cancelled his much-vaunted summit with Kim Jong-Un

Iowa Census Bureau names the fastest-growing cities in America

Ankeny, Iowa, is #4. The growth rate has been pretty remarkable.

Science and Technology A 3D-printed tiny home

(Video) Making it out of concrete is pretty cool, and permits a one-day production cycle. But it's worth asking whether the constraint on building high-quality homes in poor places is a shortage of labor, the cost of materials, or something else. Is a 3D printer really removing an important constraint?

The United States of America "You can go elsewhere for a job, but you cannot go elsewhere for a soul."

Senator Jeff Flake offers a pointed set of remarks at the Harvard Law School commencement ceremony


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May 25, 2018

Threats and Hazards Federal government workers have lost track of 1,500 migrant children

They were separated from their parents by our draconian policy on border-crossing, and now it's unclear where 1,500 of them have gone. That's truly appalling. If this isn't a firing offense for people up and down the chain of command, what is? These are children we're talking about. Like the video of children being gassed in Syria, or like pictures of children being starved in Yemen, this story is a massive transgression that feels even worse to any reasonable person with little people at home whom they would defend with their very lives. A century ago, Herbert Hoover was known as the Great Humanitarian. Put aside anything you think about his Presidency -- as a private citizen, he had done more to rescue refugees and save young lives from starvation than anyone alive today. Where is our Hoover in 2018? Who is empowered to step up to solve these problems? Who is being invited to do so? Does anyone know where even to start?

Socialism Doesn't Work China plays hardball with Taiwan

The Communist government on the mainland is engaged in a pressure and isolation campaign to put the screws to the Republic of China. And it's happening at a time of edgier relations between the United States and the People's Republic of China.

Computers and the Internet "As unlikely as this string of events is..."

How an Amazon Echo recorded a household conversation and sent the clip to a family acquaintance

News Where are the nerds?

A complaint from Britain that describes a problem often encountered in the US, too: Not enough nerds in the rooms where big decisions are made. Not everyone needs to be a technician...but at least a couple should be in the room, most of the time.

Threats and Hazards Nebraska drug bust uncovers enough fentanyl to kill 26 million people

In a time of big numbers, this one is huge

Weather and Disasters A dynamic display in the clouds

Storms bubbling up in Iowa

Weather and Disasters 10 years after the Parkersburg EF-5 tornado

When the EF-5 is classed as total devastation, it's not an exaggeration

News Overcrowded city life is overrated

There are certain opportunities available only in certain very large cities. But there are also hidden costs that go along with megalopolitan living that people too often overlook when evaluating whether to live there. For example: Getting out of New York City by road on a holiday weekend is a complete nightmare. Same for most other really large cities. The time spent in traffic in the biggest cities -- as compared with somewhat smaller cities that offer, say, 75% of the same amenities -- is an enormous toll to place on one's existence without some kind of compensation.

The United States of America Defense Secretary Mattis addresses Air Force Academy graduates

"It is now your responsibility to ensure our adversaries know they should always prefer to talk to our Department of State, rather than face the US Air Force."


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May 27, 2018

Computers and the Internet FBI asks if you'd kindly reboot your routers

Their request: "Foreign cyber actors have compromised hundreds of thousands of home and office routers and other networked devices worldwide. The actors used VPNFilter malware to target small office and home office routers."


@briangongolbot on Twitter



May 29, 2018

Threats and Hazards "[B]aseless stories of secret plots by powerful interests"

The President's comfort level with conspiracy theories is not only much too high, it's a hazard to the public

Threats and Hazards "What will historians 50 years from now know that Trump and Kim do not now know about their own nuclear standoff?"

High stakes, limited information, and volatile personalities -- a combination that certainly amplifies the risk of something going wrong

Computers and the Internet Today's tech giants aren't forever

At least not if they face level playing fields of competition. But the story could turn out differently if companies like Google and Facebook are able to manipulate the rules in such a way that they become, either explicitly or implicitly, like public utilities.

Aviation News Smartphone-driven miniature missiles

Lockheed Martin is developing a miniature missile, "roughly the size of a collapsed umbrella", intended to intercept drones and other small devices capable of putting a kinetic payload in the sky below the threshold of normal radar detection

News EU considers banning single-use plastics

Plastic straws could be gone, and plastic bottles close behind them


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May 30, 2018

Threats and Hazards There's nothing sane about steel and aluminum tariffs against our allies

To wreck the trade system like this is reckless, self-defeating, and not at all consistent with the supposed national-security purposes of the tariffs

Threats and Hazards Surveillance by China's domestic police is much worse than you think

A nation can get rich, but material wealth isn't worth much if it impoverishes the soul. The Communists there might be running a great power, but it isn't a good one.

News New York Times shows sensible restraint

"[W]e intentionally didn't name any of the perpetrators" of school shootings. Good for them. It's clearly a problem with socially contagious effects, and doing anything to grant notoriety to the perpetrators contributes, even if unintentionally, to the problem.

Agriculture A 440-year-old white oak

Felled by a storm, the tree's cross section is going on display at the Wallace State Office Building

Business and Finance Former JC Penney CEO thinks 75% of shopping malls are doomed

He thinks the ones that will survive are the ones with Apple stores and Tesla branches


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May 31, 2018

News Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is very, very displeased

He promises immediate and equivalent retaliation against President Trump's arbitrary tariffs. Sticking it to our allies is a stupid and short-sighted policy. As Senator Ben Sasse has noted, "Blanket protectionism is a big part of why we had a Great Depression." If you don't want to understand the problem with tariffs from an economic standpoint, then try at least to understand it from a historical one. Or even look at it from the perspective of the US aluminum industry, which itself opposes the tariffs.

Business and Finance "This short-term 'economic sugar high' cannot continue indefinitely"

That the US economy is performing well according to the current metrics is a fine thing that makes people feel good. But the growth rate has some artificial boosters behind it, and the fundamentals (which include a speedily deteriorating Federal budget picture and a lot of political risk) don't inspire confidence for the current rates to continue for long. And when that rate slips toward the historical/fundamental norms (or even turns south and dips into recession), the insulin crash following the sugar high is going to hurt.

News "[N]o one really keeps track of the children placed in custody"

America is simultaneously doing two things that need urgent review and attention from officials with a moral compass: First, in the words of a writer at the Niskanen Center, "What changed was the enactment of the 'zero tolerance' policy that requires all parents who cross illegally be put in criminal proceedings, rather than the more expedient civil removal proceedings [...] even if they claim legal asylum." Second, we're seeing a failure in the quality and oversight of the system that is supposed to take responsibility for the welfare of the immigrant children who are in the government's care. Surely we can do better than this on both fronts.

Iowa Mercy plans a mental-health hospital in Clive

A community shouldn't be caught short-handed when it comes to dealing with traumas affecting the brain any more than it should be under-prepared for illnesses affecting other organs of the body. An expanded supply of patient beds (100 for inpatient care) would be a great development for the metro area.

Computers and the Internet Alexa is listening

An editor at MIT Technology Review takes the unusual (but entirely valid) step of listening back to what Alexa has recorded in her house. And it's a lot, including plenty of things she didn't command it to do.

Humor and Good News Woman runs half-marathon in a suit

To win a Guinness world record. So now it's yoga pants at the store and suits on the track.

News Ideas matter, as much as ever

Imagine a 20th Century minus the two world wars. You can't, really, unless you can also imagine a 20th Century without the ideologies that triggered those wars. That is your simple proof that ideas matter. Fight the bad ideas with good ones, before it comes to arms.


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