Brian Gongol Show on WHO Radio - May 12, 2018

Brian Gongol


The Brian Gongol Show can be heard on WHO Radio in Des Moines, Iowa on 1040 AM or streaming online at WHORadio.com. The show airs from 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm Central Time on Saturday afternoons. Podcasts of show highlights are also available.


Please note: These show notes may be in various stages of completion -- ranging from brainstormed notes through to well-polished monologues. Please excuse anything that may seem rough around the edges, as it may only be a first draft of a thought and not be fully representative of what was said on the air.

Segment 1: (11 min)

BUT FIRST: The opening essay

News New York's checkered history of political scandal

And that is why "limited" government matters even more than "small" government. Limit what you expect from it. Limit the powers you grant to it. Limit the damage that bad people can do when they get the levers of power. The limits matter even more than the apparent size.

The United States of America When the winners are losers

Don Blankenship lost, but it's still worthwhile to read the compelling argument from Jay Cost that the nature of the primary electorate too often risks giving unelectable nincompoops the nominations to run in general elections. A primary-election/general-election system is a fully honorable and decent way to run a democracy -- IF people vote in the primaries. The problem for the US today is that people (backwardly) think being an independent voter requires sitting out the primaries. No matter how much people resent joining parties, the only way to get good general elections is to have broad-based primary elections. The only way to get good general elections is to have broad participation in primary elections. When sane people step out of the process at the top of the funnel, they end up disgusted with what comes out at the bottom. We really need for sensible centrist voters to get just as mad about stopping the wingnuts as the wingnuts get mad about advancing their pet issues. Every interested independent should pick a party and vote in a primary. You can re-register as "independent" the next day.

Segment 2: (8 min)

News "The genius-bias is a strong one."

An interesting challenge to the way people (specifically men, in this article) credited with works of genius sometimes end up getting a free pass to behave awfully. We should probably grapple with that problem.

Humor and Good News A+ advertising placement

When the tweet says something about Prince William, but the embedded ad appears to be a picture of an excited anthropomorphic pickle

Segment 3: (14 min)

Threats and Hazards "Jail is not a place for mental health patients."

A tough look at the problem of increasing rates of violent crime in small-town Iowa. We have layers of problems at play here -- from mental-health issues to politicians' drug-war posturing to overcrowding to underfunding to a punishment-based approach that neglects rehabilitation. The system needs lots of reform.

Iowa Foster parents take in their 100th child

After 22 years, they're dialing back a little so they can visit their biological grandchildren

Business and Finance Generally good rules for running good meetings

Two additional items absent from an otherwise good list: (1) Include written reports with the agenda wherever they can substitute for an oral report; use the meeting to ask questions and debate rather than absorb info. (2) Not only should someone be in charge of running every meeting, someone else should be the designated Devil's Advocate, tasked with poking at least one hole in every major idea or proposal. Meetings generally succumb to passive groupthink without someone specifically charged with advancing a contrarian view.

Segment 4: (5 min)

Brilliant! Raising the price of housing in a place where housing costs are already astronomical.

Segment 5: (11 min)

Broadcasting Reel-to-reel tape recorders are trying to make a comeback

Radio geeks all over the world, fingertips still scarred from years of using razor blades to splice RTR tapes, bodies permanently demagnetized by bulk erasers, join in this chorus: "No...no...NONONONONONO!"

News Why police don't drive Crown Victorias anymore

Cop-rated SUVs are a whole lot better in a lot of ways.

News Keep a close eye on the "Belt and Road"

China's massive global infrastructure initiative isn't an unalloyed good, even for the countries getting the investments

Segment 6: (8 min)

Agriculture "Chinese buyers are canceling orders for US soybeans"

It doesn't take actual tariffs to create trade disruptions. The threat alone has been enough to create real-world consequences.

Threats and Hazards Why remove 57,000 Hondurans?

A country of nearly 330,000,000 people surely has the capacity to accommodate 57,000 people without excessive strain. There's no need to be cruel -- which is how the revocation of "temporary protected status" for those Honduran immigrants really appears. They came to the United States after the devastation of Hurricane Mitch, and it shouldn't be seen as though the United States simply took on a deadweight of 57,000 people. By and large, people bring economic activity with them: If the border between Iowa and Minnesota were erased, the resulting "state" would have a much larger population, but the underlying economic activity would likely be more or less the same. The failure to understand this is deeply embedded in the conceit that immigrants "take" from the country to which they move. Kicking out the Hondurans really makes no sense at all. It's disruptive and hurtful.

Segment 7: (14 min)

Curiosity, competence, and humility

News Professional reading lists -- and their limits

An intriguing dive into the nature of professional reading lists -- commonly issued by military leaders, though not found quite nearly often enough elsewhere. Aside from raw personal experience, nothing shapes a person more than the books they read. We'd be better off as a society if there were more open discussion (and debate) about which books ought to be read. Sen. Ben Sasse has made the case for families to create their own reading lists, and that's a worthy suggestion as well.

A very gracious listener the other day emailed me to ask whether I had a recommended reading list. It's a terrific (and flattering) question, and I wish I had a good one to offer. I've thought about the question a lot, but I'm partially hampered because I know that my own reading has been skewed heavily in favor of a few categories of books that happen to interest me a lot -- and because I'm acutely aware of just how many important books I haven't read.

The problem is that with humility about the incompleteness of any reading list I could offer could easily come paralysis. So the best I can do is offer a work-in-progress.

For as long as I can remember, I've tried to keep up a reading list on which I rate books on two scales: Importance and enjoyability. I don't think it's a great stretch to claim that the best books are both important and enjoyable. These are the books that have rated at least a 4 out of 5 for importance (on my scale):

Science and Technology Artificial intelligence gets attention from Congress

Sen. Joni Ernst has proposed a bill to create a "National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence", to serve in an advisory role to the President and Congress on competitiveness, risks, and developments in artificial intelligence, both domestically and internationally

Segment 8: (5 min)

Health Soldier grows her own replacement ear

Built from rib cartilage, doctors carved out the replacement ear and implanted it inside her arm so it could grow. The doctors called the surgery (to transplant it onto her head) a success -- the ear will work, and it will even have nerve function.

Unsorted and leftovers:

News Someone needs to atone for the eggplant emoji

Considering the near-simultaneous explosion in misspelled apps (Tumblr, Flickr, Reddit), the mainstreaming of emojis, and the rise of text-speak, future historians are going to wonder how an entire civilization became voluntarily illiterate all at once. The flexibility of English is one of the main reasons it's become the world's lingua franca, and its adaptability probably encourages creative thinking among fluent English speakers. But text-speak is still crap.

Weather and Disasters Severe weather patterns far quieter than normal

The National Weather Service office in Des Moines notes that on a year-to-date basis, we're at about half the number of severe storm (severe thunderstorm or tornado) watches issued nationwide, as compared to most years. Maybe even less than half.

News The news is too much like a series of "Arrested Development" quotes

Too much of what's happening around the President involves incompetent offspring, lunatic attorneys, and suspicious foreign dealings

Threats and Hazards The NRA picks Oliver North as new leader

The last three years have been one giant, non-stop natural experiment in escalation of commitment. And that's not a good thing.

Threats and Hazards When Putin's team doesn't want you to hold a rally

Doesn't really seem like there's a perfectly innocent explanation for this.

Threats and Hazards Tell us more about those payments, Mr. Cohen

The President's personal attorney got some interesting project work from a variety of sources upon Trump's accession to the Presidency -- including payments from a high-profile Russian money man

Humor and Good News Rebirth of a dead Kmart

Chicago architects convert a 55,000-square-foot ex-Kmart store into an attractive college-prep school for $10 million

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