Brian Gongol Show on WHO Radio - March 30, 2019

Brian Gongol


The Brian Gongol Show can be heard on WHO Radio in Des Moines, Iowa on 1040 AM or streaming online at WHORadio.com. The show airs from 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm Central Time on Saturday afternoons. Podcasts of show highlights are also available.


Please note: These show notes may be in various stages of completion -- ranging from brainstormed notes through to well-polished monologues. Please excuse anything that may seem rough around the edges, as it may only be a first draft of a thought and not be fully representative of what was said on the air.

Breaking news to watch

Segment 1: (11 min)

Segment 2: (8 min)

Segment 3: (14 min)

Totally Unnecessary Debate of the Day

Phooey to all this nonsense about there being a problem with the pace of baseball. At its heart, baseball is totally different from football, soccer, basketball, and hockey. That it is paced around giving each side a turn is a feature, not a bug. Baseball is a companionship sport. You get to enjoy it 162 times a year. You don't have to give all your attention to it; it doesn't want your attention like football does.

News Baseball is a companionship sport

Phooey to all this nonsense about there being a problem with the pace of baseball. At its heart, baseball is totally different from football, soccer, basketball, and hockey. That baseball is paced around giving each side a turn is a feature, not a bug. It is a companionship game -- something worth indulging (especially by radio) 162 days a year. It doesn't, and shouldn't, demand a person's full and unrelenting attention for every moment of every game.

Last week's poll

Segment 4: (5 min)

Contrary to popular opinion

News The inconvenient truth of high-speed rail in America

Our population density is a fraction of what is found in places with good passenger rail service. Many of us have sympathetic feelings in favor of a modernized, high-speed rail system. But we're just spread much too thin in America to make the same economics work. Compare the density of places with impressive high-speed rail service -- like Italy (206 people per square kilometer, or about 533 people per square mile), Germany (237 people/sq km), or Japan (348 people/sq km) -- with that of the United States: 36 people/sq km. There are parts of the country where we are more densely packed, for sure, but broadly the United States is much, much more spread-out than the rest of the countries we often consider as technological and economic peers. For the economics to work out comparably with those peers, we would have to be able to build and maintain the infrastructure for 1/5th the cost of theirs.

Segment 5: (11 min)

Technology Three | The week in technology

Computers and the Internet You didn't mean to keep that, did you?

Facebook's archives are turning unreliable, according to a Business Insider report. If you want to save content you've ever posted online, don't trust third parties.

Computers and the Internet What's with all the robocalls?

An industry insider says a combination of technological tricks and poor regulatory oversight has led to an insufferable deluge of calls to many American numbers

Lyft had an IPO

The moral of the story: Beware, always

Segment 6: (8 min)

Segment 7: (14 min)

Your role in cyberwar

Don't underestimate how hard China is mining social media accounts for espionage purposes.

The moral of the story: The most important question isn't "Should we get rid of things we don't like?", it's "And then, what happens next?"

Segment 8: (5 min)

The moral of the story:

The moral of the story:

Unsorted and leftovers:

Threats and Hazards Russian police raid opposition-party headquarters

Per the Khodorkovsky Center: "They'd received an anonymous call about the 'distribution of extremist literature'. This is spookily reminiscent of the KGB raids on Samizdat houses."

This week

Water News A million wells are threatened

Per CNN: "The National Ground Water Association estimates that people living in more than 300 counties across 10 states have their groundwater threatened from bacterial and industrial contamination carried by flood waters." It's impossible to participate normally in modern American life if you don't have clean running water.

By the numbers

News The inconvenient truth of high-speed rail in America

Our population density is a fraction of what is found in places with good passenger rail service. Many of us have sympathetic feelings in favor of a modernized, high-speed rail system. But we're just spread much too thin in America to make the same economics work. Compare the density of places with impressive high-speed rail service -- like Italy (206 people per square kilometer, or about 533 people per square mile), Germany (237 people/sq km), or Japan (348 people/sq km) -- with that of the United States: 36 people/sq km. There are parts of the country where we are more densely packed, for sure, but broadly the United States is much, much more spread-out than the rest of the countries we often consider as technological and economic peers. For the economics to work out comparably with those peers, we would have to be able to build and maintain the infrastructure for 1/5th the cost of theirs.

Make money

Have fun

Broadcasting Love is...

...setting up a streaming media profile completely from scratch that you can share as a couple when you're both in the same room, so as not to destroy the algorithms behind either partner's individual profile. It's basically the new "We're moving in together". (This advice could save a marriage).

Clean up after yourself

Mind your business

Threats and Hazards Someone tell the President: "Easy money" is the same as a "weak dollar"

His Twitter attack on the Federal Reserve for its policy of rate increases illustrates that he is guided by instincts alone on critical matters like economics -- where instincts are not enough. If someone were to tell him his policy is a "weak dollar" policy, he would undoubtedly do an about-face.

Quote of the Week

The United States of America Without protections for minority interests, government is just anarchy dressed up in fancy clothes

Words from James Madison: "In a society under the forms of which the stronger faction can readily unite and oppress the weaker, anarchy may as truly be said to reign as in a state of nature, where the weaker individual is not secured against the violence of the stronger"

Iowa news

Hyperbole is going to kill us all

21st Century conservatism

Curiosity, competence, and humility

News Servicemembers shouldn't be political props

The chief of Australia's Defense Force made a point of having his people step out of sight when a government event turned political. Three cheers for that.

Have a little empathy

Water News A million wells are threatened

Per CNN: "The National Ground Water Association estimates that people living in more than 300 counties across 10 states have their groundwater threatened from bacterial and industrial contamination carried by flood waters." It's impossible to participate normally in modern American life if you don't have clean running water.

Inbox zero

Stop the deliberate ignorance

Tin Foil Hat Award

Threats and Hazards Russian police raid opposition-party headquarters

Per the Khodorkovsky Center: "They'd received an anonymous call about the 'distribution of extremist literature'. This is spookily reminiscent of the KGB raids on Samizdat houses."

Yay Capitalism Prize

Capitalist solution of the week

Kickers

One year ago

Five years ago

Ten years ago

Programming notes

Justin Brady -- Today from 4-6pm CT: the author of Georgia's #LIFEact will discuss the final obstacle & the founder of http://Ancestry.com discusses race and what happened when a user discovered their families disturbing history.

TONIGHT: Your Iowa Barnstormers are 3 and 0 and playing in Cedar Rapids!
-Joe Stasi has all the action starting at 6:35pm on 1040 WHO and the iHeartRadio APP!

STARTING MONDAY: your shot at $1,000 in KEYWORD FOR CASH!
-up to sixteen chances every weekday
-listen for the keyword for the hour and text it at 200 200

Live read: iHeartRadio app

iHeartRadio app

Live read: Contests

Live read: Smart speakers (hour 1)

Smart speakers

Live read: Smart speakers (hour 2)

Smart speakers

Calendar events to highlight

Calendar

Recap

Listen to the full episode from March 30, 2019 here

Segments 1 and 2 were preempted. Sorry; they don't exist!

Segment 3: Baseball season is back, so our Totally Unnecessary Debate of the Day is "What do you think about the designated hitter?"

Listen to segment 3

Segment 4: Like a lot of people, I am emotionally attached to the lure of high-speed rail. I've ridden the trains in Europe, and in my heart, I'd love to see them in the USA. But that doesn't make them economically sound: We just don't have the population density to make them work.

Listen to segment 4

Segment 5: There's yet more flooding season yet to come. Beware and prepare.

Listen to segment 5

Segment 6: Lyft's IPO, Facebook's memory hole, and robocalls galore. The Technology Three for this week give you lots of reasons to "caveat emptor". In particular, check out the expletive-filled but educational Twitter rant of a call center operator who explains why we get so many junk calls these days.

Listen to segment 6

Segment 7: Brexit, the Electoral College, and the big question nobody likes to answer, but should -- "And what happens next?"

Listen to segment 7

Segment 8: If you want to halt the free movement of goods, money, people, or ideas, then it's incumbent on you to explain why it's absolutely necessary. Otherwise, you're just standing in the way of the free flow of things that generally ought to flow freely.

Listen to segment 8